The Trinity: Three In One

Trinity Lesson/Craft

Topic: Trinity

The young girl represents the prayer position in modern times: hands clasped with head bowed.

The prayer position today is shown, hands clasped and head bowed.

Bible Explorations: Isaiah 55:8-9; Matthew 3:16-17, 28:19; John 14:9-11. 14:5; 1Corinthians 8:4, 1Peter 1:2

This lessons gives you clues for introducing the term–TRINITY.
The Bible Exploration above has different verses that make reference to God in three divine persons.

Prayer

Before having your opening pray, point out to the kids that today, we generally pray with our hands clasped and head bowed. The photo of the young girl is an example.

In distant past, a person prayed with arms crossed over their chest and head bowed.

In distant past, a person prayed with arms crossed over their chest and head bowed.

Explain that in the distant past, people prayed with their hands crossed on their chest. Using the picture of the young boy, demonstrate this. Notice that the boy has one hand on each of his shoulders. Explain that a monk baked treats for kids that learned their verses. These treats represented the crossed praying hands. This same shaped treat is now called a pretzel.

Point out that the pretzel shape will be used to model the trinity.

1. Ask if anyone can define the trinity.

2. Explain that the word trinity means three divine (Godly) persons.

3. Point out that the name of one of the three divine persons is God the Father.

4. Ask if anyone can identify the name of a second divine person.

A craft pretzel made of clay models the Trinity with each compartment representing God in three persons; God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit.

A single roll of clay is shaped like a pretzel. This clay craft can be used to teach young and old about the Trinity.

Note: It is important that the three names each begin with God:

God the Father
God the Son
God the Holy Spirit.

Teaching Tip: Kids should only give one answer so that others can participate.

Making a Clay Pretzel to Model the Trinity

The clay pretzel models how one God can be Three Separate Divine Persons.

1. Give kids a small plum-size ball of modeling clay.

2. Point out that they each have ONE BALL OF CLAY.

3. Instruct the kids to roll the clay ball into a long rope-shape.

Teaching Tip: Using a comparable size ball of clay, roll out a clay-rope for an example. This helps kids to know how long to make the rope.

4. Point out that they now have ONE CLAY ROPE.

5. Instruct the kids to use the clay rope to form a pretzel shape.

Teaching Tip: Prepare a clay pretzel example and/or a drawing of a pretzel for kids to look at.

6. Ask the kids how many holes there are in the clay pretzel. (THREE).

Sum It Up!

One clay rope in the shape of a pretzel forms three separate parts.

One God in three divine persons; God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit.